Thoughts on enterprise IT

Dustin Amrhein

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Top Stories by Dustin Amrhein

The recently announced IBM WebSphere CloudBurst Appliance is poised to make a big splash in the cloud computing market. Its ability to create, deploy, and administer private WebSphere cloud environments gives customers the ability to create and manage a services oriented cloud. To provide a more in-depth look at what the appliance delivers, I’d like to take a short look at the creation, deployment, and administration capabilities to understand what each one means to the user. To get started, in order to leverage WebSphere environments in a private cloud, you need to construct WebSphere configurations optimized for such a virtual environment. Using WebSphere CloudBurst you can do just that. WebSphere CloudBurst ships a virtual image packaging of the WebSphere Application Server called WebSphere Application Server Hypervisor Edition. From this new virtual image offer... (more)

Five Reasons to Choose a Private Cloud

As enterprise interest in cloud computing offerings and concepts continues to increase, the number of solutions in both the public and private cloud spaces increases as well. There's been much debate over public versus private cloud, even to the point of debating whether there can be such a thing as a private cloud. I'm not here to debate the latter (in my opinion the location of the service has nothing to do with whether or not it is a cloud), but rather I want to take a look into why consumers would choose private clouds over their public counterparts. During the last several ... (more)

Peeling Onions in the Cloud

From a conceptual standpoint, consumability through abstraction is arguably one of the most important benefits of cloud computing. The cloud offers up some collection of raw resources (i.e., servers, networks, storage, and applications) as a set of pre-configured, pre-integrated, and ready to use services. As a result, users typically need to know a good deal less about how those resources are setup, and can instead concentrate on consuming them to deliver their own set of services. While the benefits offered by abstraction (namely consumability) are most certainly a good thing... (more)

Cloud Computing Intersects IT Innovation

Recently, I attended SOAWorld 2009 in New York City, and I had the pleasure of listening to many distinguished speakers talk about extremely interesting topics.  One of my favorite talks was given by a fellow IBMer, Kareem Yusuf. During the course of Kareem's keynote, he discussed SOA, cloud computing, and areas of innovation in the IT industry. The areas of innovation were of particular interest to me, and Kareem highlighted five of them: 1. Automation and Management 2. Elastic Applications 3. Software Delivery 4. Pricing and Licensing 5. Cloud-based services As I look at each of th... (more)

The Federal Cloud Journey

Over the past few months it has been interesting to see the federal government's embracement of cloud computing. The catalyst for much of this seems to have been the appointment of Vivek Kundra to the Federal CIO position. Mr. Kundra was an advocate of cloud computing during his role as CTO of the District of Columbia as he pushed for the use of cloud-based services in the local government (a push that continues today). In his new role, Mr. Kundra has continued to advance the notion of using cloud computing to drive efficiency and innovation into the government's IT operations. I... (more)